Beautiful Places in Africa


Dallol,Ethiopia

Screen Shot 2018-07-30 at 16.35.03

Dallol (Amharic: ዳሎል) is a locality in the Dallol woreda of northern Ethiopia. Located in Administrative Zone 2 of the Afar Region in the Afar Depression, it has a latitude and longitude of 14°14′19″N 40°17′38″E with an elevation of about 130 metres (430 ft) below sea level. The Central Statistical Agency has not published an estimate for this settlement’s 2005 population; it has been described as a ghost town.

Dallol currently holds the official record for record high average temperature for an inhabited location on Earth, where an average annual temperature of 35°C (95°F) was recorded between the years 1960 and 1966. Dallol is also one of the most remote places on Earth, although paved roads to the village of Hamedela, which is close, are being built. Still, the most important mode of transport besides jeeps are the camel caravans which travel to the area to collect salt.

Nearby is the Dallol volcano, which last erupted in 2011.

Victoria Falls, Zambia

5551dbde848fb65978bce8f5.jpg

Known by the Kololo tribe living in the area in the 1800’s as ‘Mosi-oa-Tunya’ – ‘The Smoke that Thunders’.  While it is neither the highest nor the widest waterfall in the world, Victoria Falls is classified as the largest, based on its combined width of 1,708 metres (5,604 ft) and height of 108 meters (354 ft), resulting in the world’s largest sheet of falling water. is presently known as the greatest curtain of falling water in the world. The waterfall is on the Zambia/Zimbabwe border, on the Zambezi River. David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary and explorer, is believed to have been the first European to view Victoria Falls on 16 November 1855, from what is now known as Livingstone Island, one of two land masses in the middle of the river, immediately upstream from the falls near the Zambian shore. Livingstone, like many before and after him got dibs on renaming it from the original indigenous name, and he named his “discovery” in honor of Queen Victoria of Britain. A famous feature is the naturally formed “Armchair” (now sometimes called “Devil’s Pool”), near the edge of the falls on Livingstone Island on the Zambian side. When the river flow is at a certain level, usually between September and December, a rock barrier forms an eddy with minimal current, allowing adventurous swimmers to splash around in relative safety a few feet from the point where the water cascades over the falls

 

Bazaruto Island, Mozambique

Image result for Bazaruto Island

Bazaruto is a sandy island located approximately 80 kilometers (50 mi) southeast of the mouth of the Save River, Mozambique. It is the largest island in the Bazaruto Archipelago and in the Bazaruto National Park. Because the water along this coastal area is very clear, much of the sub-surface channel pattern around the island is discernible. Known for marine life like turtles and dugong. The clear waters of Two Mile Reef are filled with colorful fish, reef sharks and moray eels, while the deeper area in Indigo Bay is home to sailfish and marlin. Traditional dhow boats run to nearby islands Santa Carolina and Benguerra.

 

Knysna, South Africa

Knysna_waterfront.jpg

Probably from a Khoisan word meaning “place of wood” or roughly “fern leaves” is a town with 68,659 inhabitants as of 2011 in the Western Cape Province of South Africa and is part of the Garden Route. It lies 34 degrees south of the equator, and is 55 kilometers east from the city of George on the N2 highway, and 33 kilometers west of the town of Plettenberg Bay on the same road. Little is known about the indigenous inhabitants of Knysna, the Khoikhoi. The area east of present-day George was separated by high mountains and deep gorges, making it virtually inaccessible to European travellers. In 1878, an important discovery was made in the area. A gold nugget was found in the Karatara River, near Ruigtevlei. Soon fortune hunters from all over the world arrived at the Millwood Forest in search of gold, and Millwood grew into a bustling town. Millwood was declared a gold field, the first in South Africa. However, soon not enough gold was being recovered to sustain a growing town, and the mining industry in the area collapsed. Some miners relocated to Knysna, bringing their little homes with them. One of the houses, known as ‘Millwood House’, now functions as a museum.

Mountain Oasis of Chebika, Tunisia

depositphotos_79278834-stock-photo-mountain-oasis-chebika.jpg

Chebika lies at the foot of the mountains of the Djebel el Negueb and, because of its exposure to the sun, it is known as Qasr el-Shams (“Castle of the Sun” in Arabic).

In antiquity, it was once a Roman outpost, named Ad Speculum and later a mountain refuge of the Berber people. Ad Speculum was civitas of the Roman Province of Africa between 30 BC and 640 AD.[2] Located on the Saharan limes (it) just north of Ad Turres. It was a station on the road linking Tebessa to Gafsa, the Romans used mirrors to communicate with other posts and report possible enemy incursions.

The contemporary village of Chebika ( الشبيكة ) has several hundred residents, built near the old town, abandoned in 1969 after catastrophic flooding. The site, writes Jean Duvignaud, “is placed in the intersection of two advances of the mountain that opens here towards the desert”. The urban fabric consists of a chessboard whose lines are formed by streets intersecting at the level of the market place. Many scenes of the movie Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope and The English Patient were shot in this area.

Advertisements

Written by AfricaExplorerMagazine

African Explorer Magazine is a publication being run by African Media Professionals, Explorers, Scientists, Researchers and Writers. Our Media Platforms tells African Stories from an Africans Perspective.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: