The term “Moors” refers primarily to the Muslim inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, Sardinia, Corsica, and Malta during the Middle Ages. The Moors initially were the indigenous Maghrebine Berbers. The name was later also applied to Arabs. Moors are not a distinct or self-defined people, and the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica observed that “The term ‘Moors’ has no real ethnological value.”Europeans of the Middle Ages and the early modern period variously applied the name to Arabs, North African Berbers, and Muslim Europeans.

Illustrations of Moors

In 711 the Islamic Arab and Moors of Berber descent in northern Africa crossed the Strait of Gibraltar onto the Iberian Peninsula, and in a series of raids they conquered Visigothic Christian Hispania. Their general, Tariq ibn Ziyad, brought most of Iberia under Islamic rule in an eight-year campaign. They continued northeast across the Pyrenees Mountains but were defeated by the Franks under Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours in 732.

 

Illustration of the Battle of Poitiers made by Charles de Steuben in 1837. Here it seems that the Muslim leader on the right is an Arab, but notice that the seven people behind, next to him or at his feet - except the white woman whose presence appears as accidental - are all black.
Illustration of the Battle of Poitiers also called the Battle of Tours, made by Charles de Steuben in 1837. Here it seems that the Muslim leader on the right is an Arab, but notice that the seven people behind, next to him or at his feet – except the white woman whose presence appears as accidental – are all black.
Some Arabs, Moors and Christians, in a battle against other Christians. 1254 Source: The Golden Age of the Moor, edited by Ivan van Sertima, page 58
Some Arabs, Moors and Christians, in a battle against other Christians. 1254
Source: The Golden Age of the Moor, edited by Ivan van Sertima, page 58

The Moors, who ruled Spain for 800 years, introduced new scientific techniques to Europe, such as an astrolabe, a device for measuring the position of the stars and planets. Scientific progress in Astronomy, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Geography and Philosophy flourished in Moorish Spain. Basil Davidson, one of the most noted historians recognized and declared that there were no lands at that time (the eighth century) “more admired by its neighbours, or more comfortable to live in, than a rich African civilization which took shape in Spain”

Moorish architecture in Spain. The most spectacular in the work of the Africans of the Maghreb and the Arabs, is the flamboyance of the colors, a concept which is very present in these medieval masterpieces.
Moorish architecture in Seville, Spain
The Alcazar in Seville

At its height, Córdova, the heart of Moorish territory in Spain, was the most modern city in Europe. The streets were well-paved, with raised sidewalks for pedestrians. During the night, ten miles of streets were well illuminated by lamps. (This was hundreds of years before there was a paved street in Paris or a street lamp in London.) Cordova had 900 public baths – we are told that a poor Moor would go without bread rather than soap! The Great Mosque of Córdoba (La Mezquita) is still one of the architectural wonders of the world in spite of later Spanish disfigurements. Its low scarlet and gold roof, supported by 1,000 columns of marble, jasper and and porphyry, was lit by thousands of brass and silver lamps which burned perfumed oil.

Moorish mosque in Córdoba

Image result for moorish influence in spanish languageIn the tenth and eleventh centuries, public libraries in Europe were non-existent, while Moorish Spain could boast of more than seventy, of which the one in Cordova housed six hundred thousand manuscripts. Over 4,000 Arabic words and Arabic-derived phrases have been absorbed into the Spanish language. Words beginning with “al,” for example, are derived from Arabic. Arabic words such as algebra, alcohol, chemistry, nadir, alkaline, and cipher entered the language. Even words such as checkmate, influenza, typhoon, orange, and cable can be traced back to Arabic origins.

The most significant Moorish musician was known as Ziryab (the Blackbird) who arrived in Spain in 822. The Moors introduced earliest versions of several instruments, including the Lute or el oud, the guitar or kithara and the Lyre. Ziryab changed the style of eating by breaking meals into separate courses beginning with soup and ending with desserts.

Image result for Ziryab (the Blackbird)
ZIRYAB ”THE BLACKBIRD”

The Moors introduced paper to Europe and Arabic numerals, which replaced the clumsy Roman system. The Moors introduced many new crops including the orange, lemon, peach, apricot, fig, sugar cane, dates, ginger and pomegranate as well as saffron, sugar cane, cotton, silk and rice which remain some of Spain’s main products today.

Related image

The Moorish rulers lived in sumptuous palaces, while the monarchs of Germany, France, and England dwelt in big barns, with no windows and no chimneys, and with only a hole in the roof for the exit of smoke. One such Moorish palace ‘Alhambra’ (literally “the red one”) in Granada is one of Spain’s architectural masterpieces. Alhambra was the seat of Muslim rulers from the 13th century to the end of the 15th century. The Alhambra is a UNESCO World Heritage Site

These buildings were so much appreciated that the Spanish nobles, after having reconquered their country, preferred to live there.

It was through Africa that the new knowledge of China, India, and Arabia reached Europe. The Moors brought the Compass from China into Europe. The Moors ruled and occupied Lisbon (named “Lashbuna” by the Moors) and the rest of the country until well into the twelfth century. They were finally defeated and driven out by the forces of King Alfonso Henriques. The scene of this battle was the Castelo de Sao Jorge or the ‘Castle of St. George.’

The Alhambra in Grenada
There is no doubt that the Moorish / Imperial Morocco civilization produced the most sophisticated black and African architecture, after that of the Egyptian-Sudanese civilization.

 

Lisbon painting in the 16th century by a Dutch author
We see the Moors after their defeat. There are about forty free blacks in this picture. They carry crosses, so they are already christianized
Source : Walters Museum

 

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Written by James Gathitu

I am a writer, performer, creative entrepreneur, and adventurer! My journey has been crazy and has led me at this very moment to you.

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